Keeping Distance.

Keeping Distance.

Men are taught that we can handle situations. No man wants to think any one or any thing is stronger than he is. Keep your way far from her … Proverbs 5:8  Solomon tells us that there are habits, environments, situations, or even people, that you simply don’t go near. For this reason: once a man plays with danger and doesn’t get burned, he will play with it again. His tolerance level for the rush of being in the mix of no-man’s land and walking away give him a false sense of security. You and I both know that his day is coming. Real, righteous, genuine strength, is found in knowing that the decades of labor it has taken to build your life up to this point are far too precious to risk. Keep your distance from the adulteress, and anything that may even dimly bear her reflection....
A Simple Tip For Better Hunting Photos

A Simple Tip For Better Hunting Photos

Better hunting photos is something every hunter would like to know how to do, especially when you go back through those old photo albums. If you only knew then what you know now about how to take better hunting photos then some of those pictures wouldn’t look so … well, let’s just say “sentimental.” Whether you’re using a smartphone or a real camera, the Rule Of Thirds will change everything for you.     The Rule Of Thirds.  No single truth in photography has affected me more than this timeless, simple concept.  People will take a picture of let’s say a sunset, and always wonder why the photo didn’t do the sunset justice. The reason is because, in many cases, the person took a picture of the sun and put it center frame, and failed to capture the landscape. What makes a sunset pretty is the sun reflecting off of creation; the land, the water, and everything else make a sunset pretty.  The Rule of Thirds is simple: put your subject in a corner, or off to the side, in the photo. Put it anywhere but “center frame” and you bring in the landscape.  While shooting this photo on one of our Spring Chronicles web video episodes for Sportsman Channel, I wanted to show off the yellow tops and the barn. So, I put the tom on the lower left corner, or the left third of the frame, to draw the eye toward the landscape that makes this photo give proper justice to the barn and pure country, spring feel that I felt walking out with him over my shoulder. ...
Never Saw It Coming.

Never Saw It Coming.

Several months ago I was answering email while sitting at our kitchen table. I couldn’t see him, but I knew from the sounds coming from behind me that our youngest son, Tucker, was getting into the pantry. Even before Tuck was born, I had a sneaking suspicion, or maybe it was a warning from the Holy Ghost, that he’d have more than a nominal dose of grit. He had been instructed twice to say out of the pantry. So, at this point, a spanking he was about to own. I said to him, “Tucker, are you supposed to be in that pantry? Did I say you could get in that pantry?” “No sir,” said the three year-old. However, his brain wasn’t communicating with his feet, for in the pantry he still stood, not willing to give up titled ground. I launched into a fit of parental frustration that included a 30 second diatribe about the concept of decisions that went something like this, “Tucker, right now. It’s right now. Right now … is the moment where you must make a decision. If you get a spanking, it’s because you chose it. Right now you must make a decision whether or not to obey. Either way, it’s your decision, and you own it.” Long. Deafening. Silence. “Tucker, I want to know right now. What’s your decision?” “Well, dad, I’ve made a decision … that I love you.” I can’t remember what happened after that. I’m guessing my laughter covered the transgression. A gentle answer turns away wrath … Proverbs 15:1...
The One Word That Will Change Your Story Forever.

The One Word That Will Change Your Story Forever.

My son, if you will receive my words … Proverbs 2:1 I’m a grown man. I no longer have to finish my dinner in order to eat my dessert. I can eat my dessert, and then eat dinner. In fact, I can eat two desserts, and walk away from the feast having never ate dinner at all. I’m a grown man. I can walk into my doctor for my annual physical, and when Brian tells me my cholesterol is out of whack, I can keep on moving down the road of life any way I chose. The truth is, yes, I can do what I want. However, there are no free lunches. I can hear the truth, but hearing the truth and receiving the truth are in no way blood relatives. They are strangers entirely. The single word that will change your story forever is “if.” Read the verse as you normally would and you will read right past the opening line that sets the tone for everything that follows. “If you will receive …” As in, “Hey, I’m not forcing you to do anything.” The older I get the more I realize that where I am is where I want to be, and where I want to be is nothing more than a series of choices to get there. Those choices were made one decision at a time, based on whether or not I chose to use wisdom in that moment. Hearing and receiving are two different concepts...
Trophy Photos Ruined Forever

Trophy Photos Ruined Forever

Better Field Photos is a simple concept: quick tips for the average hunter wanting to capture trophy photos on a smartphone simply by knowing how to take better images in the field.  The problem with this shot is what is wrong with the vast majority of all of us who take photos anywhere . . . it’s simply too wide. In most cases, people want to take photos and get everyone in the shot. That’s fine if you have to do that for a group shot, but what makes a photo interesting is people, and more importantly, emotion in the eyes and face of the people in the photo. You simply cannot capture emotion at a wide angle in most cases.  This was a brute of a 9 pointer that I shot years ago, and I’ll never have a great picture of it, because I simply didn’t know how to take decent photos back then. Lessons learned from failure are the best lessons, but the education is brutal! (click on the photo for a better view) I see this all the time when guys take field photos of turkeys. They want to get the beard, spurs, and whole bird into the shot. I promise you, the beard would need to be 27 inches long in order for it to look as big as you think it’s going to look. Forget trying to show off all the animal.  Here you see me with a Merriam I killed in South Dakota while filming with some of the Realtree crew. The photographer captured what makes this photo strong: the Merriam’s fan and the old, abandoned home...